Measuring Attitudes About End-of-Life Care: Evaluation of a Modified Version of the Hospice Philosop

Associate Professor John Cagle (top left) and PhD student Seokho Hong (top right) are co-authors of the recently published article "Measuring Attitudes About End-of-Life Care: Evaluation of a Modified Version of the Hospice Philosophy Scale." The work appears in the recent issue of the Journal of Applied Gerontology.

ABSTRACT: The Hospice Philosophy Scale (HPS) is the only scaled instrument that measures health professionals’ attitudes about end-of-life care consistent with the hospice philosophy. This study tested the properties of a modified version of the HPS to provide preliminary validation data on internal consistency, convergent validity, and factorability in a broad population of adults. A cross-sectional telephone survey designed to assess the general population’s attitudes regarding hospice use was administered. exploratory factor analysis elicited an eight-item instrument (HPS-8). The HPS-8 produced a Cronbach’s alpha of .73 and demonstrated sufficient convergent validity, including positive associations with a scale measuring the importance of relevant end-of-life issues (r = .41, p < .001), a personal preference for hospice (ρ = .36, p < .001), and, among those who had experienced hospice care, satisfaction with hospice care (ρ = .28, p < .01). Our evidence suggests the HPS-8 is a reliable and valid instrument for use with a general adult population.

26 views

2020 University of Maryland School of Social Work

Office of Communications  410.706.4542  bulletin@ssw.umaryland.edu