Factors Associated With Opinions About Hospice Among Older Adults - New Research by SSW's Lee an

New research by the School's Joonyup Lee, PhD student, and Associate Professor John Cagle explores "Factors Associated With Opinions About Hospice Among Older Adults: Race, Familiarity With Hospice, and Attitudes Matter," was published in the Journal of Palliative Care.

Abstract Attitudes and opinions about end-of-life care among older adults are understudied. Using survey data from the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) membership in Florida (N = 2714), this study identified predictors of opinions about hospice (OAH) among older adults. Relationships between race/ethnicity and attitudes were also examined. Results showed race of the respondent was the strongest predictor of one’s OAH. Predictors of positive opinions of hospice included being of Caucasian race, non-Hispanic ethnicity, better health, greater familiarity with hospice, a high importance of pain control, the importance of fulfilling personal goals, a desire to have health-care professionals involved in one’s care, and having engaged in advance care planning. These findings suggest a need for greater attention to culture-based elements in future research and practice.

Citation Lee, J., & Cagle, J. G. (in press) Factors Associated With Opinions About Hospice Among Older Adults: Race, Familiarity With Hospice, and Attitudes Matter. Journal of Palliative Care, 0(0), 0825859717738441. doi: 10.1177/0825859717738441

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